The immigration laws are complex and subject to change. Below are some frequently asked questions that Tahir Mella, Attorneys at Law, P.C. knows may be of concern to individuals as they attempt to complete the citizenship process:

  • Has immigration become more difficult since 9/11?

    Yes. immigration problems have increased due to more stringent requirements for citizenship. In order to meet these strict requirements, it is advisable to retain the services of a competent immigration attorney.

  • Is an exam necessary in order to become a naturalized citizen?

    Yes. The citizenship exam will test whether the applicant can speak, read, and write English, as well as if he or she can answer civics questions related to the history and government of the United States.

  • Once immigration deportation proceedings have begun, is there any way to remain in the United States?

    Yes. There are several ways your attorney can help you apply to remain in the country, including seeking a Cancellation of Removal, Adjustment of Status, or asylum status.

  • What are the requirements for U.S. citizenship?

    Broadly, the requirements for citizenship are that the applicant be at least 18 years of age, pass the citizenship test, have lived in the United States lawfully for at least five years, and take an oath of allegiance to this country.

  • Are there exceptions to the ordinary requirements for citizenship?

    Yes. Exceptions can be made for refugees, those seeking political asylum, the spouses of U.S. citizens, and other individuals with special circumstances.

  • How can I obtain immigration asylum status?

    Asylum status may be granted to an individual if he or she has applied for it within one year of arrival in the United States.— even after the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has initiated deportation proceedings.

If you wish to seek asylum status, discuss your case with the immigration attorneys at Tahir Mella, Attorneys at Law, P.C.